Counter Clockwise

So, this blog author may or may not have accidentally broiled a pizza on Friday night. But fear not, it was ultimately edible and yielded inspiration for a communications blog post.  Among the good natured ribbing proffered in the aftermath of this culinary catastrophe was an incredulous, “Why would anyone turn a knob counter clockwise??!” Hmm. Why would anyone do that? Isn’t it fascinating that in that one crummy dial (that now bears the corrective ink of a loosely held Sharpie pen) conveys an enormous amount of culturally hued communication? If you want to do this you have to first do this. Turning a knob left or right is an arbitrary thing, but it ends up being really influential if you want to add tension to your spinning bike, bake pizza, turn up the heat, make the fan run stronger in your car, flip really fast through iPod songs, turn on a faucet . . . we really do live in a clockwise world.

Doesn’t it make you wonder what other social codes are just simply convention rather than of any great significance? Doesn’t it impress you how much one can access simply by understanding that we live in a clockwise world? Doesn’t it frighten you a touch to think about how ideas can become utterly pervasive without anyone noticing or caring?

NB: This is a Canadian stove (French & English), are there English-Spanish stoves in the States?

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4 thoughts on “Counter Clockwise

  1. Round and round things go. My recollection is the lug nuts which hold tires on cars tighten in an opposite direction. That offsets the high speed rotation of the wheel which would undo a nut which tightened clockwise.

    Can you imagine a world in which there was no tech norm and the odds were 50 / 50 you would turn a knob or screw the wrong way for the desired result.

  2. If only all the door makers and installers would all get on the same page with a universal convention for when to “push” and when to “pull.” Then I wouldn’t look like an idiot when I do the wrong thing.

  3. A part of the door rubric has to do with doors going outside the building. Fire laws and building must be able to open out. I’ve been in a few small rural stores where the door opened in, and crossed my fingers there would never be a need to rush out.

    BTW, the gas knobs on my vintage stove, including the oven, turn on with a counter-clockwise motion.

    If you wish to avoid all the twisting and turning, I would recommend a Swedish Aga range. Never could afford one (space and $$) but have had meals cooked on one at a friends in the U.K.

    George

    Rebekah Says:
    If only all the door makers and installers would all get on the same page with a universal convention for when to “push” and when to “pull.” Then I wouldn’t look like an idiot when I do the wrong thing

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